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Author Topic: drawing a 3d image in CB  (Read 349 times)
RickinBeachcrest
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« on: January 13, 2018, 21:02:56 pm »

I've been using CamBam for the last couple of years and it has been great. All my work has been 2.5d. 

I have a small project that needs to be 3d.  So I was wondering if I can use CB alone can create G code for a 3d object.

I've carved out the object I need.  See attached picture.

If so can you give me a starting point in CB.
Thanks.

Rick


* DSCN0937.JPG (59.99 KB, 640x480 - viewed 28 times.)
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pixelmaker
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« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2018, 14:10:26 pm »

If the object is so simple you can create it in cambam as a rotational object
Here is your starting point.
https://www.screencast.com/t/alFbL5Q2XeK

Ralf

ps. if I think about it now, the boundary lines don't need to be projected onto the 3D object.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2018, 14:26:12 pm by pixelmaker » Logged
RickinBeachcrest
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« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2018, 19:14:52 pm »

Thanks for making the video clip Ralf.  I now know that it can be done in CamBam. 

Unfortunately I am not able to get past the language barrier and I have no knowledge of 3d Cam. 

If anyone can describe what Ralf is doing, I would be much appreciated.

Thanks.

Rick

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pixelmaker
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« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2018, 20:39:33 pm »

You wrote that you've been working with Cambam for years and you just need a push. I assumed that was true.

Draw the arc
Convert it to a polyline
Menu -> Draw -> Surface -> Extrude -> Value 0.5mm (extrusion height), tolerance =0.1
Menu -> Edit -> Transform -> Polar Array Copy -> Values = Number of Copies = 360 (░degrees), Angle per step = 1,0,0 (degree per step)
Join all 3D objects (CTRL+J), value = 0.1
Draw and join lines for the boundary (CTRL+J)
Create 3D profile
Boundary Method = Selected shapes and select polyline
The boundary margin of the tool radius (1.5) is only used for better viewing.
And only for you the video in english
ralf
« Last Edit: January 14, 2018, 20:58:53 pm by pixelmaker » Logged
RickinBeachcrest
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« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2018, 20:09:17 pm »

Ralf,
Thanks for taking the time to redo it using the english ver of CB.  It really made it easier to see what was going on.

I think I'm closer, but not quit there yet.  I've got the the shape I'm after, but no tool paths are showing. 

Thank you for all your help.

Rick


* clock bow ver2.cb (749.41 KB - downloaded 6 times.)
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EddyCurrent
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« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2018, 20:58:46 pm »

Try the attached, it's not perfect but it's closer. (I'm a bit pushed for time)

1. Clearance plane must be set higher than top of object, yours was lower
2. There was a mix up between inches and mm. for Boundary Margin, you don't want 1.5" margin
3. I changed the tool to a generic number, you should change that back to match your own library.

* clock bow ver2-B.cb (749.24 KB - downloaded 8 times.)
« Last Edit: January 15, 2018, 21:00:27 pm by EddyCurrent » Logged
RickinBeachcrest
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« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2018, 02:42:47 am »

Thanks Eddy,

I'm looking forward to giving it a go on the machine tomorrow morning.
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RickinBeachcrest
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« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2018, 18:29:06 pm »

In an effort to learn a little more, I've got another question in regard to this topic.

What is creating the tool paths on the left of the object, when viewed from a YZ plane?

See attached pdf file.

I've also attached the CB file.

Also, I normally will put the Z 0 on the top of the stock when cutting 2.5d objects.  Is it normal to put the Z 0 on the bottom of the stock when cutting 3d?

Thanks for the assistance.
Rick


* CamBam tool paths.pdf (35.93 KB - downloaded 10 times.)
* clock bow ver3.cb (749.21 KB - downloaded 2 times.)
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EddyCurrent
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« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2018, 21:13:29 pm »

I think the toolpaths are created by that strange front edge of the surface combined with the Boundary Margin required to cut the back of the surface. In reality the surface is not ideal.

updated cb file attached.

1. top of surface = Z0
As you say, that is the most common configuration and the one I would use myself. Choice is mostly down to the nature of the stock. If you need a particular amount left at the bottom then zero to bottom of stock, this is ideal if you don't want to cut into the machine table, e.g. if you use a vacuum table.

2. a new Boundary Line (46) that helps with the surface front edge.

3. changing Boundary Margin to 0.27" will allow full depth cutting.

Using 3D CAD software to create that surface seems the best plan to me.

* clock bow ver4.cb (756.42 KB - downloaded 4 times.)
« Last Edit: January 20, 2018, 21:22:08 pm by EddyCurrent » Logged
RickinBeachcrest
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« Reply #9 on: Yesterday at 03:36:20 »

Again, thank you very much for modifying the CamBam file and the explanation.  Working with 3d has been a new learning experience for me.  It is a bit more complicated then 2.5d for sure.

One quick question, if I could impose on your generosity.  How did you move the Z 0 to the top of the object?  I move 2d objects all the time, but this 3d is another thing.

This is the 1st 3d CAM I have needed in the 2 or 3 years I have been using the CNC router. 

Thanks for the help.
Rick

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dh42
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« Reply #10 on: Yesterday at 07:34:02 »

Hello

Quote
How did you move the Z 0 to the top of the object?

You can align the top of the 3D object with the align tool (transform/align)

(see at 1:10)
http://www.screencast.com/t/wUpHsU1bgGog

++
David
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Garyhlucas
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« Reply #11 on: Yesterday at 16:03:41 »

You know it really is time for nearly everyone to learn a 3d cad program. With programs like 360 Fusion available for free to hobbyists there is absolutely no excuse because of cost. For us grandpas out there 3d modeling is great way to get a conversation going with the grandkids.

When I got my first Cad program Generic Cadd 1.0 it was just the greatest thing.  Paper drawings that took me days to do never survived first contact with the shop! They were obsolete instantly and often needed to be completely redrawn. Then came Generic 3d and suddenly it was like I could hold a machine in my hand and look at from any angle. I could see that the chain path actually passed right through a support as drawn in 2d!

Now CNC and 3D printing demand an accurate 3D model as the basic starting point. So getting proficient in any 3d modeling program is a foundation requirement for all this other neat stuff.  Yesterday I attended a VEX robotics competition with my grandson.  His team had a major flaw in their design because they did not get the concept of gear reduction. The teacher asked me to help the kids because he felt they were not listening to him, because he was a teacher. He was right and they accepted my advise rebuilding the robot on the spot and making it into the competition.  They failed to make the final round when there much more powerful gear train twisted a shaft until it broke!

This week I have been invited to the robotics club meeting and I am going to try to get them to apply so basic manufacturing principles so they get the robot done sooner and better constructed. They all have Autodesk Inventor and a complete library of every robot part. So that will allow every student to present their ideas as a 3d model before they construct anything.
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Gary H. Lucas

Have you read my blog?
 http://a-little-business.blogspot.com/
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