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January 25, 2020, 11:36:49 am


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Author Topic: Precisely tune the Z probe  (Read 1181 times)
Bubba
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« Reply #30 on: December 29, 2019, 19:35:00 pm »

Gary, not all Z zero probes need to be clipped to spindle. With mine setup  the plate (pcb board) is connected directly in to index pin . Mach3
2010  screenset contain various probing routines ,and none require probe wire to clipped to spindle..
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Dragonfly
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« Reply #31 on: December 29, 2019, 20:10:17 pm »

I use the clip more out of custom and just to be sure. Smiley
The chassis, resp. the spindle is connected to ground. The positive voltage goes to the copper side of the plate which is made out substrate for single sided PCB.
I show the photo to demonstrate the most simple way I started with several years back. Now it is not the only method I am using. But for one-off jobs it does not need any additional setup, just a macro tied to the Mach3 button.
Here you can see a fixed touch plate used for repetitive jobs and driven by another macro.
http://www.cambam.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=8287.msg65874#msg65874
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lloydsp
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« Reply #32 on: December 29, 2019, 20:17:11 pm »

I abandoned the use of a height-setter, because the sheets of goods I cut most vary in thickness across their length and width.

I had a 'permanent' one on the side-bar of the router, and it was never correct.  The only one that would work at all for me now would be a 'portable' touch-off plate or gauge like that.  But it seems just as easy to just touch off to the work itself.

Lloyd
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EddyCurrent
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« Reply #33 on: December 29, 2019, 20:32:30 pm »

Quote
But it seems just as easy to just touch off to the work itself.

Lloyd

If it's metal and you don't mind a possible mark on it.
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #34 on: December 29, 2019, 22:42:40 pm »

Quote
But it seems just as easy to just touch off to the work itself.

Lloyd

If it's metal and you don't mind a possible mark on it.


A mechanical touch off works just fine.  No wires at all.  Just a gage or a piece of paper. Its scary if you haven't done it before, but it will get you within a thousandth pretty consistently after you have done it a few times.  The only real issue is possible issues from Z axis backlash.  Hopefully your head hangs firmly against its nut so that any backlash is taken up by gravity.  I run really large code files though, and the machines (Mach3) gets a little cludgy when you get over 800-900K lines of code.  Manually touching off a tool change mid program can be a little dicey.

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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #35 on: January 12, 2020, 22:29:03 pm »

According to my machine this little circle is about between .0001 and .0002 inches deep.  I had crashed into the tool height setter and wanted to reverify its height measurement.  At the point the machine made this circle my height indicated was .0003, so the crash "maybe" did affect the height setter.  The anvil just rests on the indicator plunger, and it has a physical stop before it could max out the indicator, so the indicator part is not damaged.  

The machine itself isn't better than .0005, but with movement in only one direction it should be as good its ball screw assembly.  

There is a nasty divot and bulge in my height setter now.  

I advanced the face on the height setter indicator about .0004.  Now hopefully it should be within +/- (traveling in the down direction) 0.0001 of the surface its resting on.  

THIS IS A SMOKE TEST.  

I turned it on, ran it down, and found out whether or not it would let the magic smoke out.  

There is NOTHING that well tell you where it is better than making a mark with it.  

That being said, there is probably a couple  .0001 - .0003 variance in the surface just from the tool marks made by the face mill.  I was rather please that it made such a perfect circle being so shallow.  

All of that is moot anyway.  My tool height gage only resolves to about .0005.  LOL.  Only that one tool is that good relative to the height setter.  

FYI:  I can still just barely feel a tiny bit of bump with my finger nail on that circle.  Oh, yeah, that was made with a 1/4 inch end mill.  (6.35mm)  It helped my smoke test my height gage, but it also tells me the mill is in tram decently, and that end mills really are slightly hollow on the tip.  



* Circle.JPG (65.42 KB, 907x685 - viewed 14 times.)
« Last Edit: January 22, 2020, 16:07:03 pm by Bob La Londe » Logged

Getting started on CNC?  In or passing through my area?
If I have the time I'll be glad to show you a little in my shop. 

Some Stuff I Make with CamBam
http://www.CNCMOLDS.com
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