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Author Topic: Help with stl model to make a mold  (Read 283 times)
hanau
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« on: October 08, 2019, 18:37:21 pm »

Have a stl file of a set of Master jump wings.
Anyone able to help me with how to set up and cut the mold for the wings?
I have not ever tried doing a 3d model before and not sure what i am supposed to do.


Thanks

* Master Jump Wings.stl (1061.9 KB - downloaded 13 times.)
« Last Edit: October 08, 2019, 18:51:43 pm by hanau » Logged
stevehuckss396
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« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2019, 20:33:19 pm »

What material will the final product be made of?
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EddyCurrent
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« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2019, 20:53:53 pm »

It's a very large object, the first thing would be to scale it in CamBam to the required finished size, unless of course it has to that size.
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2019, 21:46:42 pm »

Making a negative of the model will work better in CamBam.  You can make a mold from a positive in CamBam, but often it falls flat. 

I would note that it doesn't appear to have draft angle, and you have small features that appear to be quite deep relatively and dead end.  This is not a good candidate to make a mold that you will be able to cut easily or demold easily.  You may also have issues venting some of those dead end features. 

It might work "marginally" as a single plate casting mold, but some of those issues will still crop up.  I get models like this from customers all the time.  Usually they expect to save 90% of the cost of making the mold by having done the model themselves.  Often I have to decide if its worth what they expect to pay to spend three times as long teaching them how to design an item suitable to cast or inject as if I had just designed the item myself. 

Anyway, lets start with your intended casting or injection media and planned mold layout.  Then we can work on making your design better suited to mold, and finally we can work on the actual CAM to get it ready to cut. 

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hanau
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« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2019, 01:55:20 am »

Thanks for the input.Sorry I should of put more info into the orginal post.
I will be making the mold out of graphite. Which will be 3" square.
I didn't resized the orginal file, sorry for that. But it will be somewhere around a 1" square x 0.125 thick at most

I'll see if I can get a negative made instead of the positive. It will be late tonight or tomorrow if I able to make a negative. The orginal I found on the web.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2019, 02:03:18 am by hanau » Logged
Bob La Londe
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« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2019, 17:12:55 pm »

Thanks for the input.Sorry I should of put more info into the orginal post.
I will be making the mold out of graphite. Which will be 3" square.
I didn't resized the orginal file, sorry for that. But it will be somewhere around a 1" square x 0.125 thick at most

I'll see if I can get a negative made instead of the positive. It will be late tonight or tomorrow if I able to make a negative. The orginal I found on the web.

I'd suggest making your own if you have a capable CAD program.  Yes, its a lot of work, but it could more work to "fix" that model. 

If you look at the near vertical ribs in the middle I suggest they go all the way into the features above and below.  Also instead of extremely deep ribs dome the backing up and make the ribs just deep enough to show as a feature.  The overall dome can be the same, but make the back deep and the ribs shallow.  Then on every side add a few degrees of angle so that when the casting shifts just a little its free and falls out of the mold. 

Perhaps even look at the real item you are trying to duplicate.  Its likely that the professional who made the original mold already addressed all of these issues. 

Last... I've had extremely bad luck getting models off the internet.  Even ones I paid for.  I have several libraries of models, and I have yet to actually use one in a serious project.  Ok... I did sort of uses some roses I got off the old Sketchup library, but even that I had to modify. 
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hanau
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« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2019, 17:53:00 pm »

I going to have to go over to the college and see if they offer any kind of class to learn how to do 3d modeling. I have tried to use the online tutorials on blender and fusion 360 and they have not been any help for me.I keep getting lost or the step they tell me to do doesn't work.

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Garyhlucas
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« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2019, 19:43:03 pm »

There are two kind of very different forms of 3d modeling. The block and cylinder kind I do where accuracy is very important, and the sexy curves kind that artists do. Most of the mechanical modelers, Fusion 360, SolidWorks etc. kind of struggle with what you are trying to do. They can do it but it falls into the skillset of the true masters of each program.
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2019, 21:26:41 pm »

There are two kind of very different forms of 3d modeling. The block and cylinder kind I do where accuracy is very important, and the sexy curves kind that artists do. Most of the mechanical modelers, Fusion 360, SolidWorks etc. kind of struggle with what you are trying to do. They can do it but it falls into the skillset of the true masters of each program.

Fusion360 is easier to use as a solid modeler, and ViaCAD is even easier (IMO), but they both also can do some artistic work with surface modeling and push pull adjustment.  Olsen does a great job of showing push pull surface modeling with ViaCAD in his spoon making tutorial.  One of the best similar tutorials I have seen for Fusion360 is one where the user models a complete clamshell razor knife.  I usually actually get what I need with solid model tools.  I do sometimes have issues with internal consistency when they get fairly complex.  

I think most of the original model shown could be done as a solid model with a few tweaks and adjustments to get the overall shape right. 

I found with CAD programs the best way to learn them was to pick a tutorial (any tutorial) video and run it on one computer screen while following along on another duplicating the work.  When it gets ahead of you, just back up and pause the playback or rewatch it until you catch up.  

I had a buddy of mine tell me he did exactly that with some of my CamBam videos.  Watch, pause, backup, rewatch…  I always thought my CB videos were pretty simple, but you never know what somebody else might need a little help with.  



« Last Edit: October 09, 2019, 21:28:26 pm by Bob La Londe » Logged

Getting started on CNC?  In or passing through my area?
If I have the time I'll be glad to show you a little in my shop. 

Some Stuff I Make with CamBam
http://www.CNCMOLDS.com
hanau
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« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2019, 22:17:30 pm »

Gas anyone had any luck with fiveer in getting a model done?

I done some of fusion video even the ones supplied by fusion when you download it.
Downloaded it and started doing what it told me but the tutorial models where not all even there.

I'll work on gettinrtthe file made and will revisit this in the future.

Thanks for the input and recommendations.

BOB I have watch your video when making the mold it was helpful on understanding stuff things.
always try tk watch your new ones right when I am alerted.
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2019, 00:58:29 am »

I've never used fiver, but there is another member right here on this forum who has created stl surfaces for me in the past.  I probably way over paid him, but he did a great job for me.  I was the one who set the wage, so I have no complaints. 

Maybe he will see this thread and send you a PM. 
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Getting started on CNC?  In or passing through my area?
If I have the time I'll be glad to show you a little in my shop. 

Some Stuff I Make with CamBam
http://www.CNCMOLDS.com
Dragonfly
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« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2019, 08:27:16 am »

From what I saw, the way this model was made is not suitable for a mold. It's simple extrusion and has features impossible to machine - very narrow slots. And even if they can be machined in the mold I very much doubt the product could be released. A mold requires a draft angle to be applied to the vertical walls to help pressed material come out of the mold.
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