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July 23, 2019, 14:14:50 pm


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Author Topic: mirroring files  (Read 380 times)
chuckeroo
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« on: July 08, 2019, 18:22:40 pm »

I have tried a few different ways and failed miserably.  The last thing i tried with success this time was to of course work off of the centered holes and use shoulder bolts from the stock to the jig holding this in precise alignment whenever the flipping occurs to mirror the part . Regular bolts are a little under sized but shoulder bolts have an exact diameter. Result is no wiggle after flipping the part. Oh and by the way i do work with wood most of the time. I also leave notes in the cb. file as to length of rough stock and  where to zero the bit whether it's from the top of stock or from the bed.Just a little something that may help someone else trying to tackle this task. Left an example cb file.

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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2019, 18:57:48 pm »

Being a mold maker I do mirrored work all the time.  I tend to layout the job relative to two primary axis'.  This allows me to easily have a rock solid reference to use for mirroring.  

I lay out just one side, and then I mirror by either of two methods.  Sometimes I use both.  

The first is to mirror the geometry using (Select Geometry >> Right Click >> Transform >> Mirror.  Then I just click on two points along the primary mirror axis.  This is fast, easy, and allows you to use optimal geometry for both sides of the mirror lne.  It has one very major drawback.  If the geometry is complex it can cause CamBam to quickly hit its memory limitations.  Not just 3D surfaces, but complex engrving can also be an issue.  

The other is to just copy and paste the MOPs and use the transformation matrix.  This seems less obvious, but I use it all the time to quickly make the mirror image of a mold.  Since I often used mixed machining for mold cavities, and it has no negative impact on engraving or drilling it is very fast to create the second half once the first is done.  I just modify the few MOPs that need to be different from one side to the other and delete those like vents that ony need to be on one side.  

Typically I'll wind up with a machining tree that looks like this.

Part 1 Left Plate
Face Plate
Cut Vents
Drill screw holes for tapping
Cut Runners and Gates
Press Fit Alignment Pins
Rough Cavity
Finish cavity

Part 2 Right Plate
Face Plate
Cut Vents
Drill Screw holes for tapping Clearance
Cut Runners and Gates
Press Slip Fit Alignment Pins
Rough Cavity
Finish cavity

If I mirror along the Y axis I simpley select all the MOPs in Part 2, open the transformation matrix, change the the top left value from 1 to -1, and press OK.  You can't use the data entry tool at the bottom if applying to mixed MOP types.  Also, this does not work if not all MOPs have an identical transformation.  If some already have a different transformation matrix, you will have to apply the mirror change to those separately.  The big drawback of this is you don't see any geometry on the other side of the line and it can be hard to keep track of everything.  This is why I often use both methods of mirroring.  I mirror simple geomtry like the plate outline and cavity outline so I can see that the tool paths look right.  

Then I generate two files.  One for the right plate and one for the left plate.  Typical names are:

RIGHT 6x 3y p75z TL00.nc
LEFT 6x 3y p75z TR00.nc

This lets me keep track of which plate I am cutting, stock size, and zero position even if I don't cut it until days later or if I am cutting another copy months later.  I may add othhr words to the file name like PRESIZED which means the stock has already been trued to length and squared on another machine.  LEFT-PRESIZED 6x 3y p75z TR00.nc

Once you do these things a few times you will wonder how you ever did work without using these abilities.  You need to start with the general layout of what you plan to do already in your mind.  

« Last Edit: July 08, 2019, 19:01:27 pm by Bob La Londe » Logged

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lloydsp
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« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2019, 19:01:04 pm »

Nice treatise, Bob!

Lloyd
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chuckeroo
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« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2019, 21:08:14 pm »

Thanks for sharing bob
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2019, 02:24:35 am »

And... just to throw a monkey wrench in the works, I have cut both sides of a two piece mold with only one code file representing only one side of the mold. 

I bet some of you can guess how before I come back to tell you in a few minutes.

I posted about it on CNCZone years ago, and to my knowledge nobody every replied to my post.  Not even to tell me how stupid it was.

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lloydsp
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« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2019, 11:44:25 am »

It wouldn't be fair for me to comment, because I've done that too.  More-especially, I've done it on work bigger than the working envelope of my mill!<grin>

Lloyd
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2019, 19:04:42 pm »

The Third Way


* The Third Way.jpg (571.69 KB, 1680x1050 - viewed 23 times.)
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lloydsp
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« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2019, 19:27:47 pm »

Heh!  I recognize that screen! <smile>

Lloyd
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2019, 20:05:07 pm »

I don't recommend the third way.  You can get all kinds of turned around and twisted up in your thinking if anything doesn't go just right. 
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lloydsp
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« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2019, 20:39:11 pm »

Yep.  I tend to do 'reflections' by jigging, not by software.  I'm too-prone to making mistakes that are easily handled by a proper jig.

Lloyd
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2019, 19:09:09 pm »

Yep.  I tend to do 'reflections' by jigging, not by software.  I'm too-prone to making mistakes that are easily handled by a proper jig.

Lloyd

How do you mirror a mold with jigging?  Maybe a cut through part, but then its already its own mirror. 
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Some Stuff I Make with CamBam
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lloydsp
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« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2019, 19:16:51 pm »

Bob,
I have a 'small footprint' milling machine.  It's only a 12x18 milling area, which is hardly enough for some of the larger pieces we have to do.

So I build and bolt-down "pin jigs" to the bed, with corner-holders, etc., such to hold the work in the same orientation, whether it's 'first cut' or reversed.  It takes a bit of effort to first 'square-up' then find the exact center-point, in order to ensure both halves are identical; but it's not hard to do.  'Just takes a few minutes to confirm.

Lloyd
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2019, 16:30:16 pm »

My biggest work horses are my smallest machines so I understand about using pins and registers to cut parts larger than their work envelope.  I use similar methods for stacker plate molds that have center sections that need to be machined on both sides.  

X4 6.5 x 11.5
X5 6.5 x 11.5
X5 6.5 x 11.5
PCNC1100 9 x 18
KMB1 (14 x 24)

On the KMB1 since it has a head that can be turned left or right, and can be extended or retracted the real limit the total reach of the head, and my ability to reindex after moving the head.  If I plan for it I could probably cut nearly twice the XY envelope without moving the part.  If I accept moving the part and took the enclosure off the table my limit would be weight load of the table, and sag from overhanging parts.  

« Last Edit: July 16, 2019, 16:35:25 pm by Bob La Londe » Logged

Getting started on CNC?  In or passing through my area?
If I have the time I'll be glad to show you a little in my shop. 

Some Stuff I Make with CamBam
http://www.CNCMOLDS.com
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