CamBam
News:
 
*
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 22, 2019, 18:21:14 pm


Login with username, password and session length


Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
Author Topic: how do you tellwhat is positive axis direction?  (Read 1051 times)
ajawamnet
CNC Ewok
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 19


View Profile
« Reply #15 on: June 18, 2019, 16:48:34 pm »

The cartesian coordinate system is fixed in all standard conventions.  There are a displayed axis lines in CamBam, unless you have turned them off.  If your STL file is not where you want it to be or oriented how you want it relative to the cartesian coordinate system then move it.  

Yes I know some very advanced CAM systems allows you to move the origin or change the work plane, but once you have done that the cartesian coordinate is still the same.  Just relative to a different origin and work plane.  

In CamBam its really easy to find your orientation.  Just hold down the alt key and double left click the mouse on the screen. It will zoom in or out to show all currently displayed geometry and it will reorient the view to a top down view with x axis shown left to right and y axis shown from the top of the screen to the bottom of the screen.  

I know.  I know.  "Yes but some other software tells me..."   I get it and its a nice extra reminder in that other software when you get turned around or lose your bearings, but its not necessary.  Read the previous paragraph again if necessary.  

I've been doing 3D modeling since 1989... here's a tower farm drawn 40 miles to scale in Autocad back when they first started supporting Surface Modeling:

http://www.ajawamnet.com/ajawam4/trans.dwg

a screenshot:
http://www.ajawamnet.com/ajawamnet/page4/towers.jpg


Done on a 386-25 with no mouse - all coord call outs.  A Time command shows:
Command: time

Current time:             Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 11:39:58:031 AM
Times for this drawing:
  Created:                Saturday, December 12, 1992 at 3:41:12:630 PM
  Last updated:           Friday, October 09, 1998 at 12:15:38:340 PM
  Total editing time:     0 days 11:26:28.877
  Elapsed timer (on):     0 days 11:26:28.877
  Next automatic save in: 0 days 00:29:44.962


I've got over 300 CAD/CAM/EDA programs - all of the 3D ones discern the positive coords. Even that old version of ACAD shows the UCS in ref to the right hand rule...

Even my Field Solvers for RF (I'm actually an electrical guy - www.ajawamnet.com) show a positive direction - see attached

Cambam is the only tool I've ever seen that does not explicitly show the positive right hand rule condition at a glance.

BTW that screenshot is just the old XP box I still use... in some of those folders are dozens of old DOS-based CAD programs for things like antenna design - and even they use an XYZ positive indicator to show the positive axis direction...


* mec.jpg (1093.46 KB, 3132x1119 - viewed 76 times.)
« Last Edit: June 18, 2019, 16:51:06 pm by ajawamnet » Logged
EddyCurrent
CNC Jedi
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4059



View Profile
« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2019, 16:56:23 pm »

Just to be clear, CamBam does not show the positive direction of each axis, take it or leave it.
Logged

Made in England
Garyhlucas
CNC Jedi
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1292


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2019, 17:58:37 pm »

I’ve also done 3d modeling for a very long time. As a beginner which way was up as you revolved a model or opened someone else’s model was very disorienting. Then I learned that a big part of the issue was sloppy modeling practices where models were dragged and dropped with no regard for orientation with the world axis. So now I always orient parts and models as to how you would expect to see the actual real object, and have trained the young beginners to do the same.

CamBam isn’t a Cad program, it is a Cam program with a bit of Cad tacked on to reduce the need to go back and forth between programs to get the job done. It is really 2-1/2D and follows the conventions of machining much more than Cad.

When I design parts I always consider how it will be made as that greatly affects the cost. So positioning the part as it would appear on the machine is something I try to do.

So the axis directions on screen? Eh I suppose it might help the first couple parts you do but it sure doesn’t rise to a level of importance for me.
Logged

Gary H. Lucas

Have you read my blog?
 http://a-little-business.blogspot.com/
Bob La Londe
CNC Jedi
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3755


^ 8.5 pounds on my own hand poured bait.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2019, 19:59:09 pm »

Well, since you are a superior CAD'sman in every way with a quadzillion more years experience than anybody else it shouldn't be that big of a deal for you then.  

I started my design work with pencil and vellum myself.  Used to take blacklines down to a a local engineering firm to have them run off blue prints for me when I needed prints to go with my submittals for a required fire alarm system.  If they had drawn the main building plan they'ld provide me with blacklines and I could mark them up right there in their offices. 
Logged

Getting started on CNC?  In or passing through my area?
If I have the time I'll be glad to show you a little in my shop. 

Some Stuff I Make with CamBam
http://www.CNCMOLDS.com
Bob La Londe
CNC Jedi
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3755


^ 8.5 pounds on my own hand poured bait.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2019, 20:02:25 pm »

Actually if it is still that big of a deal, just draw your arrows on a separate layer in your default template file.  Problem solved, and no big deal for somebody with your years of experience.  
Logged

Getting started on CNC?  In or passing through my area?
If I have the time I'll be glad to show you a little in my shop. 

Some Stuff I Make with CamBam
http://www.CNCMOLDS.com
Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS! Dilber MC Theme by HarzeM
Page created in 0.139 seconds with 20 queries.

Copyright © 2018 HexRay Ltd. | Sitemap