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October 15, 2019, 04:39:57 am


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Author Topic: High Speed ATC Spindles  (Read 3866 times)
lloydsp
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« Reply #60 on: October 11, 2019, 02:23:35 am »

Yeah... all the above.

But I work with both small end mills, and Forstners with a 'tit'.  There's no great way to accommodate the tit on a Forstner bit AND the tip of a 0.093" endmill.  I wish there were.  I could MAKE a more-accurate depth-gauge than the one on here (which just uses a common microswitch, duh!).

Lloyd
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kvom
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« Reply #61 on: October 11, 2019, 12:33:17 pm »

I zero on my manual tool-change mill using a 1" gauge block.
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lloydsp
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« Reply #62 on: October 11, 2019, 14:34:18 pm »

'Gauging' isn't the problem, the tiplet on the Forstner is.

One possible solution is to make my gauge block pivot eccentrically on top of the height gauge, so I can swing the hole which accommodates the tip in or away from dead-center, as I desire.  That would work, so long as I remember to pivot it!

Lloyd
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #63 on: October 11, 2019, 20:09:05 pm »

How about maybe a custom gauge that slips over the end of the forstner bit. Machined specifically for the application.
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lloydsp
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« Reply #64 on: October 11, 2019, 20:33:17 pm »

Bob, I'd need six different ones.  I use a variety of them, depending upon the customer's needs.

Each one is 'custom ground' to a precise diameter to admit the customer's paper tubes with proper interference in the plates.

That's a good idea, though.  Maybe I could come up with a 'universal fit' gauge block.

Lloyd
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #65 on: October 12, 2019, 15:29:21 pm »

Or just make six of them.
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lloydsp
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« Reply #66 on: October 13, 2019, 00:34:01 am »

"Or just make six of them."

----
Until they all change in six to eight months.  EVERY time they order new paper tubes, the tube-winding companies come out with tubes a few thousandths (six to ten smaller or larger) different sizes.  They send me samples of each new lot of about 20K tubes.

Their effects don't have to change, because they are considerably smaller than the i.d.s of the tubes.  But the o.d. has to fit closely (not tight, but 'close') to the i.d. of the bore in the plate, in order to make a secure glue joint.

It means I grind new bits once a year, at least; usually more often.  In this case, I think I may have to come up with a 'more universal' device.  Maybe -- just a block of precise height, with a 'tit hole' to accommodate the tips of the Forstners, regardless of diameter, and of such a material (like hardened aluminum) that won't mar the spurs, but will still take incidental impact from the spurs without making big dents.

I wish it were easier, Bob.  I surely do.  But, I guess having a Darex machine improves my ability to serve their needs.

Lloyd
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #67 on: October 13, 2019, 01:59:20 am »

How critical is bore depth of the holes?  If just within a hundredth or so a dry stable hardwood (hard by hardness not greenery type) might be good enough.  Hard rock maple. Iron wood.  Etc.  LOL.  Actually iron wood will wipe a saw faster than aluminum.  LOL. 
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Getting started on CNC?  In or passing through my area?
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lloydsp
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« Reply #68 on: October 13, 2019, 11:59:22 am »

Thanks, Bob!

It hadn't occurred to me to use wood.  I have some Korean mahagony-colored wood from the 1950s that is as dimensionally-stable as plastic.  Hmmm.....

Its grain is so 'closed' you cannot discern any grain except for the color-differences across the width (no 'feel' to the grain whatsoever), and it's resinous-enough that it is traditionally finished by 'boning', but the resins are not sticky, ever.

Lloyd
« Last Edit: October 13, 2019, 14:03:08 pm by lloydsp » Logged

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