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October 15, 2018, 22:53:10 pm


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Author Topic: roughing cycle for outline contur  (Read 686 times)
AirRacePilot
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« Reply #15 on: October 08, 2018, 15:38:37 pm »

Thanks all for your helping me. So i think i can find a way for me.

But for further releases of cambam look at this cycle for rough milling:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_U0tBGxj6o

This is my idea i have looked for.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2018, 15:41:42 pm by AirRacePilot » Logged
EddyCurrent
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« Reply #16 on: October 08, 2018, 15:52:32 pm »

I think you are maybe looking for this plugin, http://www.atelier-des-fougeres.fr/Cambam/Aide/Plugins/TrochoPocket.html

and video; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjvzy2JIImI
« Last Edit: October 08, 2018, 15:54:43 pm by EddyCurrent » Logged
Dragonfly
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« Reply #17 on: October 08, 2018, 19:59:19 pm »

I've seen a dedicated roughing cycle, like the one on the video shared by AirRacePilot.
But in CAM programs which are incomparable in pricing with CamBam and work directly with solid models (not .stl). Thus they can automatically recognize features like pockets, holes, etc in their 3D dimensions. And given a coorect description of the stock block they automatically generate roughing operations, as well as finishing ones.

But ...
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dwc
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« Reply #18 on: October 08, 2018, 20:15:05 pm »

But ...
Yeh, the ones I know are much more expensive than CB, a factor 200 to 300 or more.
They would have to save me something around a half a years work to be worthwhile.
CB has the best relation price/functionality around.

Another thought, won't turning the entire piece into chips take much more time than just milling around what you need?  Think about it.
Don
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #19 on: October 08, 2018, 20:52:59 pm »

Not if its a feature on a larger part. 
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Garyhlucas
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« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2018, 01:57:17 am »

Can some one explain to me how that roughing routine with all the rapid moves that aren’t cutting is faster than taking out the bulk of the material by spiraling outwards continuously at constant depth engagement? I get full depth cutter engagement but I would think that inside or outside you’d cut as much as possible and then do that dancing around to cleanup what the spiral path left behind.
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Gary H. Lucas

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dave benson
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« Reply #21 on: October 09, 2018, 14:41:42 pm »

Is this any help Garry
https://www.mmsonline.com/articles/the-appeal-of-peel-milling
Dave
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Garyhlucas
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« Reply #22 on: October 10, 2018, 00:31:31 am »

Dave,
After reading this I have concluded that the previous example in the video was actually a poor example of this technique because the profile and pockets both could be spiralled milled faster, and then with the trochoidal style cutting used for cleanup in tight areas. Instead they used it everywhere.
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Gary H. Lucas

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AirRacePilot
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« Reply #23 on: October 10, 2018, 06:14:05 am »


The idea for adaptive cutting is, only to cut with the outside cutting edge of the milling tool. This is the best solution for hard materials. So remember:

The hypocycloid cycle is working in a way that the cutting tool have to dive into the material over axial direction. In this case you need a cutting tool with a cutting edge over the mid axes of the tool and the axial force is very big and you have to slow down the feedrate a lot.  And also i think that in this case the cutting tool will be worn off really fast.

The idea of adaptive cutting is to go with the milling tool in the right z-high outside of the working part and then the tool has only to cut more in radial direction than in axial direction.

That´s why i think this cycle is helpfull.

Regards Frank


« Last Edit: October 10, 2018, 07:14:34 am by AirRacePilot » Logged
Bubba
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« Reply #24 on: October 10, 2018, 13:49:11 pm »

The idea for adaptive cutting is, only to cut with the outside cutting edge of the milling tool. This is the best solution for hard materials. So remember:
*******************

So, use profile MOP with tangent move.. Wink
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lloydsp
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« Reply #25 on: October 10, 2018, 13:57:01 pm »

Yeah, Frank.  That sort of cutting is already accommodated in CB.

Lloyd
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Garyhlucas
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« Reply #26 on: October 11, 2018, 00:51:21 am »

Another thing to remember is that this HSM machining hugely favors big modern machines with huge axis servos producing enormous acceleration rates that few of us will ever see. That makes those non cutting rapid motions waste a lot less time. For most of us those rapid motions may make these MOPs much less useful.
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Gary H. Lucas

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dave benson
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« Reply #27 on: October 11, 2018, 13:21:31 pm »

Hi Garry
I've used the Trocho Mops for( Roughing) pocketing to good effect by setting the Milling direction to Mixed, which stops the rapids. My Mill is capable of this now that I've added the 25 mm linear slides and added some extra gussets to the Z Axis.
 
In general I've found that I've been able to take much greater Z depth increments and lift the cutting feed rate up as well, so the cutting time has decreased significantly.

Dave
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #28 on: October 11, 2018, 15:56:31 pm »

Since you never have a corner cut or a 90 degree step over the machine is much happier.  I sometimes use it for 3D roughing with silhouettes, but its slow to implement that way so I only do it for stock and repeat jobs where the CAM time is offset by the improved machine time. 

For roughing, yes mixed.  Definitely.  Very efficient.  I haven't really fallen in love with the profile MOP, but the pocket MOP is hugely useful. 
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Getting started on CNC?  In or passing through my area?
If I have the time I'll be glad to show you a little in my shop. 

Some Stuff I Make with CamBam
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