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November 13, 2018, 21:59:14 pm


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Author Topic: I need some help with a conversion  (Read 7298 times)
kvom
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« Reply #90 on: February 13, 2018, 12:24:29 pm »

I have used some silver grease on trailer hitch connectors.  Prevents oxidation and gives a better connection too.
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lloydsp
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« Reply #91 on: February 13, 2018, 20:33:06 pm »

A new 20HP vacuum blower is coming in a couple of days.  I had to fire up the forklift, and make sure it would run OK when it came.

And today, a new spindle motor arrived.  It's a beauty!  It's a new Columbo 24Krpm spindle with a separately-powered fan, so it can run at low rpms without over-heating.  The new cable/wire for the spindle was incredibly-expensive.  It cost over $388USD for 45' of it!  (But, I think, worth the price and the work to replace the existing under-sized wire.)

Lloyd
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« Reply #92 on: February 14, 2018, 01:46:11 am »

Tinning wires end, precision crimping, connection blocks

Time consuming, yea.

Problem eliminating ... oh yea!


* soldering.jpg (108.94 KB, 640x480 - viewed 50 times.)

* crimping.jpg (106.73 KB, 640x480 - viewed 55 times.)

* trucks with motors.jpg (114.45 KB, 640x480 - viewed 51 times.)

* test bench setup.jpg (359.69 KB, 640x480 - viewed 58 times.)
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Garyhlucas
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« Reply #93 on: February 14, 2018, 03:37:37 am »

A new 20HP vacuum blower is coming in a couple of days.  I had to fire up the forklift, and make sure it would run OK when it came.

And today, a new spindle motor arrived.  It's a beauty!  It's a new Columbo 24Krpm spindle with a separately-powered fan, so it can run at low rpms without over-heating.  The new cable/wire for the spindle was incredibly-expensive.  It cost over $388USD for 45' of it!  (But, I think, worth the price and the work to replace the existing under-sized wire.)

Lloyd

What size was the new cable you bought?  I have some 25 ft lengths of 4 conductor Igus Servo cable with two braided shielded pairs for sale on Ebay.  I got 240 feet of it used from a machine I built years ago that was taken out of service.  I used it for all 4 axis on my own machine, about 50' and have about 75 feet left.
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lloydsp
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« Reply #94 on: February 14, 2018, 12:07:48 pm »

Gary,
This is for a 3-phase spindle, a separate fan, and a separate thermal-protection circuit.  Four #14AWG wires for the motor (3+gnd), two #16AWG for the fan, and two #16AWG for the thermal shutdown.

It's all very fine, stranded wire, of an alloy designed for continuous flex operations, specifically made for CNC equipment with a jacket that supposedly will handle 9" radius bending all day for decades.

It's about $9.70 per foot!

The folks at Columbo were 'polite' about it.  They warned me about sticker shock on the wire BEFORE they told me that it's 'pretty important' in terms of long-term reliability, and that they'd used it specifically on my make and model router, so they knew it would 'fit' and flex properly.

Since I hate trouble-shooting stuff, I thought it was worth my future peace of mind to make such a one-time expense.

Lloyd
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lloydsp
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« Reply #95 on: February 14, 2018, 15:05:18 pm »

Hmmmm.... it gets interesting.

I'd never really dug into the individual wire assignments on this router before.  Today, I'm replacing the old spindle wiring with new, and testing the new spindle.  These Columbo spindles come with a built-in 'clixon' style thermal overheat switch you can use to trigger a shutdown if the spindle overheats.

Slop-Sabre never implemented the thermal cutout!  I guess they presumed that SMOKE would tell you when to shut it down.

So, one more thing to do, even on the old setup, before I put any real hours on this new equipment.

Lloyd
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lloydsp
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« Reply #96 on: February 14, 2018, 20:43:34 pm »

WOW!  Boy is the new spindle QUIET!  The old one would drive you out of the room.  You can speak comfortably with this one running at 24Krpm.

So, I guess it's time to leave the 'spare' on the machine, and send the old one to the dealer for new bearings.

Lloyd
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« Reply #97 on: February 14, 2018, 21:48:02 pm »

Hello

The old one has a external fan too ? or as on mine it run at the same RPM than the spindle ?

The fan is really noisy when it run at 24000 RPM.

A video about some spindles ; the HSD (the last on the video) has a separate fan, has your new one (and also a T° sensor). Mine is like the ELTE 1.1KW

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kt1mYw1cz5Q

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David
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lloydsp
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« Reply #98 on: February 14, 2018, 22:51:40 pm »

Yes, my old one has the spindle-powered fan.  The new one is continuously powered, external.

I can remove the spindle fan from the old one, and also mount an external fan on it.  But after having gotten the old spindle to a 'quiet place' to examine it, I realize, also, that the bearings are SHOT... they make noise, even when you turn it by hand!

I think what I'm going to do is ask the vendor to replace the bearings, and IF POSSIBLE, mount an external fan on the unit.  If not, just - please - remove the spindle fan, and I'll add my own.

Lloyd
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lloydsp
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« Reply #99 on: February 15, 2018, 15:42:55 pm »

Well, I'm about to add a manual 'A' axis to this machine. 

Although, initially, we only have five different fixed angles to drill (and so can be accommodated merely with properly-placed 'pivot holes' and locking holes), I plan to lay it out flexibly-enough so that I can accommodate an A-axis motor, in the future.

I was dreading this, but it looks like it will be simpler than I first thought.  The worst part is, I have to disassemble all the work I did to mount the new spindle!

Lloyd
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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #100 on: February 15, 2018, 15:53:15 pm »

The A axis will be on the spindle?  I always thought that would be a huge mathematical headache to machine stuff that way.  Cool.  We want to see THAT!!!  Well, I do anyway. 
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lloydsp
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« Reply #101 on: February 15, 2018, 17:39:01 pm »

Actually, Bob...

IF my chuck could guarantee that the tool would always mount exactly the same distance from the spindle nose, the math is pretty easy (just some simple trig').

But since mine is an ER25 collet tool holder, one cannot guarantee tool 'stickout' -- so, I think I've developed a strategy to set the tool angle and height and x-position satisfactorily.

Let me 'play' with it a while, and if it works, then I'll let you know how it goes, and how I did it.   If not, I won't <grin>.

Lloyd
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lloydsp
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« Reply #102 on: February 15, 2018, 17:52:55 pm »

OH... and to be very clear, I'll be adding a manual 'B' axis to the machine, not 'A'.  There's no room under the gantry to pitch about the X axis, so I have to 'roll' the head side-to-side, about the Y axis.

In any case, the trig works out the same except for the major axis vector.

I've done some preliminary checks, before I even started taking the machine apart, and I have enough leeway at both ends of x to hit the edges of a 48"-wide sheet of goods at up to 35-degrees off vertical. That's plenty for our purposes, since right now, the maximum angle of incidence for our contracts is 20-degrees.

LLoyd
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« Reply #103 on: February 15, 2018, 19:15:51 pm »

Maker of "inexpensive" 4th, 5th, 6th axis

http://doughtydrive.com
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lloydsp
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« Reply #104 on: February 15, 2018, 19:33:31 pm »

Those look nice.  I'm faced with a 'limitation', though, that has nothing to do with price.  Those things take up a good-bit of space.  If I were designing this machine from "the ground up", I'd accommodate that.  But I didn't build this POS.  I'm just making it work like it should.

I have a maximum of about 5/8" I can 'extend' the head off the X slides, before I run out of travel at the far end of Y.  So this whole apparatus must not protrude from the X plate more than that...

That limits my 'flexibility' in this matter.  But it will be perfectly usable (IF I do it right), and even manually changing the B angle shouldn't take more than three minutes.  

As I said, I'm going to equip this thing with the ability to accept a B-axis motor at some time.  But right now, the only goal is to cut 14 hours off the time it takes to cut ONE sheet of goods by my 'trigonometric' method I'm presently using.

I got further irritated at the ShopSabre folks today.  As I progressed through taking-apart the spindle head, I realized that some fasteners HAD TO BE metric, because the components (like ball slides, etc) were made in Europe or Japan (and they're good units, not complaining, there).  There's not another single place on the machine where they HAD to use anything but metric fasteners.  But no...

Why not "go metric" all the way? (what a concept!)  They hodge-podged a dandy mix of inch and metric parts all over the machine.  Duh!

Unfortunately, it's not worth the work and cost to re-do all that, but it does give me a good bit of insight into the skill-set of the ShopSabre 'engineers'.

Lloyd
« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 20:15:37 pm by lloydsp » Logged

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