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September 26, 2017, 20:42:20 pm


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Author Topic: PyCNC - first CNC machine controller on pure Python for Raspberry Pi.  (Read 513 times)
EddyCurrent
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« on: July 15, 2017, 13:44:04 pm »

Not my project, I came across it here; http://www.mycncuk.com/threads/10936-PyCNC-first-CNC-machine-controller-on-pure-Python-for-Raspberry-Pi

Code etc. here; https://github.com/Nikolay-Kha/PyCNC

Interesting and potentially useful.

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Dragonfly
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« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2017, 14:56:13 pm »

Definitely an intriguing project.
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Before asking a question do some effort and walk through all menus and options in CamBam.  Maybe the answer is there. Please.
dave benson
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« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2017, 15:12:22 pm »

Eddy

There is another project, I saw a few months ago using a pi hat with a FPGA that looks promising too.
IIRC they want to run Linuxcnc on it.
The controller I have for my lathe is also "ARM" based, and I had a peek at the plugin and I think it could be
used for other projects like robotics ect.
Dave
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lloydsp
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« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2017, 15:53:35 pm »

Eddy,
There's also an RPi-3 version of the old Commodore Amiga out, now -- for cheap.

https://hothardware.com/reviews/amiga-emulator-with-raspberry-pi-3

I personally knew Dave Haynie, the head engineer on the Amiga project.

I only add this (for 'valid content'), because there were several CAD packages (in the day) designed to run on the Amiga platform.

Lloyd
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"Pyro for Fun and Profit for More Than Fifty Years"
dave benson
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« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2017, 03:24:36 am »

I purchased the Amiga 1000 (1988) and this book and ran autocad 1.1 of course you had to boot it up with a Kickstart
disk and then a Workbench disk. I've bookmarked the movie on youtube and will watch it later for a bit of nostalgia.
Dave


* memories.png (1216.35 KB, 1000x563 - viewed 18 times.)
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lloydsp
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« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2017, 03:35:14 am »

Did you ever equip a Commodore 64 or C-128 with a Lt. Kernal hard disk system?

<grin>
Lloyd
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"Pyro for Fun and Profit for More Than Fifty Years"
dave benson
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« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2017, 04:09:32 am »

No Lloyd before the Amiga I had a TRS-80 16k level 2 (cassette Tape Drive), then an Atari 600xl.

At Work I  was running an (Osbourne portable computer running "Aston Tates" Dbase 2.3c) so the Amiga was a Quantum leap.
 
I bought the Amiga to run Autocad to start making parts for my Hybrid Tufting machine project, which ran for the first time in 2014.

Dave
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kvom
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« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2017, 19:14:33 pm »

That was a long project.   Grin
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dh42
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« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2017, 20:32:31 pm »

Hello

Andy say me that he was able to run Linux version of CamBam on a Rpi.

I also have an old Amiga 2000 'customised'  Grin, with 68030 CPU extension card, RAM extension (4 Mo), VGA adapter, ROM 3.1 (those of the Amiga 3000), scsi hard drives ... etc (and tons of graphic software)

++
David
« Last Edit: July 16, 2017, 20:35:03 pm by dh42 » Logged
dave benson
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« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2017, 00:22:22 am »

I don't want to Hijack the thread, so I'll keep it brief as I can.

In August of 1988 I was describing to management why a certain product was so problematic to make with the machine we had. (We needed a servo Drive) and in doing so I realised that patterning  could be done in a completely different way. I wasn't shy about this and told anybody who would listen.
But no one was interested, so I decided to make one myself at home in the shed.

I wrote all the software in the first couple of years (on the amiga) and then went to the local engineers to start making some of the parts and realised that I could not afford the prototyping costs.

This left me with no option but to go back to college and get my electrical and mechanical eng certificates and then buy the second hand equipment to do it myself .

I was pretty well obsessed by this stage and this is where I found CamBam and built my first mill out of an old dimensional metrology machine and a lathe headstock.

So yes 26 years is a long time, the most important thing I learnt along the way, is that (with inventing) you have to fail many times before you get it right.

Failure is not a bad thing in itself, it just teaches you what not to do next time.

David I would have loved to have had your machine all those years ago, but when Commodore went down I bought a PowerPC 6200 Mac.

Dave
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