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Author Topic: vertical cnc router  (Read 3566 times)
lloydsp
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« Reply #30 on: February 18, 2017, 19:17:17 pm »

That's good, Gary.  But for the application of the product, the terminal strips will be more-desirable.

So, get the best of both worlds!  Use good DB-25 males, properly shrouded, and break them out to easily-reconnected terminal strips!  The installation could be considered 'semi-permanent', in case a module needed to be sent back for repairs or diagnoses.

Lloyd
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zupi44
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« Reply #31 on: April 26, 2017, 19:41:48 pm »

hello

thanks for the help

I ordered the control board of the company CS-Lab (CSMIO / IP-S | 6-Axis Motion Controller (STEP / DIR), Ethernet)

Jaka
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Garyhlucas
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« Reply #32 on: April 28, 2017, 01:43:32 am »

Just had a vendor in our office today and he brought pictures of their new router. It's 5 axis with a 10 foot Y, 20 foot X, 4 foot Z axis! They are using it to machine aluminum molds for fiberglass parts, mostly tanks.
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Gary H. Lucas

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Bob La Londe
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« Reply #33 on: May 12, 2017, 16:34:45 pm »

That's interesting.  A lot of big molds like that are made of wood and fiberglass by hand. 

That's going to be some pretty expensive blocks of aluminum to start with. 



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lloydsp
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« Reply #34 on: May 12, 2017, 17:13:23 pm »

Bob, we have an outfit in Daytona Beach that makes (or used to make) such molds.  Shucks, I haven't been in their shop in eight or ten years, so I don't know if they're even still running.  Our ONLY commercial CNC-based MIG/TIG shop in this little town closed its doors about three years ago.

They started with (still expensive) brake and roller-formed Al sheeting of slightly excess thickness, MIG welded the various parts together, and anchored them to a rigid substrate of 'webbed' thinner sheet stock (not usually less than 1/2" thick), also MIG'd together for stability.  They even had a means for 'scanning' the finished blank, and filling any low spots with weldment.

Then they precision-machined the pieces to final dimensions.  The darned Z axis on that thing was almost five feet!

Most were made only for 'inside molds' with the external finish just being whatever they got from the lay-up work.  But on some, they made both male and female "half thick" parts of the fiberglass material, then used some sort of expanding foam to fill any voids between the two layers while they were clamped between male and female molds.  That way, the tank had a finished surface both inside and out.

Lloyd
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Garyhlucas
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« Reply #35 on: May 12, 2017, 23:15:24 pm »

That's interesting.  A lot of big molds like that are made of wood and fiberglass by hand. 

That's going to be some pretty expensive blocks of aluminum to start with. 

Bob,
They make their molds from aluminum when the parts quantity goes way up into the thousands per year as fiberglass molds and the wood patterns have a limited life.  In the past they made the molds in sections they bolted together after machining. I think they will bolt the pieces together first now, and machine the surface all at one time.  Also these are closed molds, they have an inner and outer shell, are vacuum inpregnated.  The layup of the fiberglass material is done by a very large robot too with a chopper gun, then dropped into the mold.

They are building fiberglass double wall foam cored tanks for us.  The first one is small 'only' 10' ft wide, 10' high, and 37 feet long!  They can do up to 12' wide, 11' tall by 50' long. and we have a job coming up with 4 of those.
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zupi44
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« Reply #36 on: June 10, 2017, 20:45:03 pm »

hello

CNC has been made, the first test cuts are made with some I am pleased with some I am not.
I am pleased with the engraving and cutting larger pieces
Not satisfied with cutting small pieces (less than 40 mm).
Please refer to the attach picture. Any suggestions what might be wrong.



Jaka


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zupi44
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« Reply #37 on: June 10, 2017, 20:46:18 pm »

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* IMG_20170610_212643.jpg (2199.87 KB, 4160x3120 - viewed 46 times.)
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zupi44
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« Reply #38 on: June 10, 2017, 20:48:10 pm »

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* IMG_20170610_212558.jpg (2934.52 KB, 4160x3120 - viewed 51 times.)
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lloydsp
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« Reply #39 on: June 10, 2017, 22:08:40 pm »

Well... if I had to guess, I'd say your machine is losing steps.  Try lowering the feed rate to HALF of what you're using now, and see if it cuts accurately.  It's either that, or there is a LOT of 'play' in the axes.

If the rate fixes it, then you're exceeding the rate at which that machine can 'keep up'.  If going half-rate does not fix the problem, then you have a backlash issue.

Lloyd
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dave benson
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« Reply #40 on: June 11, 2017, 01:09:58 am »

HI Jakka

After having  a look at the your pic,  you can see that that there are anomalies in your tool path which are 180 degrees apart.

This is a sign that you have backlash in either your X or Y axis (or Both).

I see that you are using rack and pinion drive (I use these too in various projects) and with unmodified rack and pinion setup you can only decrease backlash by increasing the depth of engagement between the pinion and the rack.
Of course you can only go "so far" and may be unable to remove all of the backlash.(this to some degree depends on the Module of the rack and pinion.

Like Lloyd say's lower your feeds and see what happens.

If you are sill not satisfied  then check your backlash in each axis, and if you find that there is some slop between the pinion and rack (and they are adjusted properly) then you can make a modified pinion to reduce the Backlash.

Nice machine I see that a lot of work has gone into it. Good luck
Dave


* errors at 180 deg Capture.PNG (561.13 KB, 944x524 - viewed 41 times.)
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