CamBam
News:
 
*
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register. April 21, 2014, 15:20:23 pm


Login with username, password and session length


Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Cut structural steel?  (Read 772 times)
lloydsp
CNC Jedi
*****
Online Online

Posts: 3353



View Profile
« on: November 30, 2011, 22:49:46 pm »

If anybody needs large structural members cut, I just SCORED (gloat!)

There are still deals out there.  I just nailed down an 8" x 22" Kalamazoo bandsaw for $900!

(it's over 40 years old, but maintained and fully working to spec -- takes 144" x 1" blades)

"Just fell into my lap" (as it were).  Pick it up tomorrow.

FWIW, this relates, because I've just put "out tables" on my R2E4, so I can handle stock much longer than the table.  The goal was to put precision rabbetts and holes in 8" x 8" structural I-beams.  Of course, I couldn't cut them myself (only, now I can!  Grin)

Lloyd
« Last Edit: November 30, 2011, 22:51:22 pm by lloydsp » Logged

Automation Machine Design, LLC.
--
"Doing the impossible in pyro automation every day."
Bob La Londe
CNC Jedi
*****
Online Online

Posts: 1364



View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2011, 00:03:50 am »

Makes my little local score seem pretty lame.  I bought an old HF RF-30, and they threw in an 8.5x18 HF lathe a couple vises, and a bunch of tooling, chucks, collet holders etc to sweeten the deal and get me to bite. 

On an on topic side...  I do plan to CNC the lathe. 

Probably going to leave the mill manual for a while. 
Logged

Getting started on CNC?  In or passing through my area?
If I have the time I'll be glad to show you a little in my shop. 

Some Stuff I Make with CamBam
http://www.YumaTackle.com
kvom
CNC Jedi
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 916


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2011, 01:10:37 am »

The guy I bought my lathe and mill from a couple of years ago gave me an old Johnson horizontal bandsaw for free.  New blade and wiring and it's all good.  Haven't tried cutting anything bigger then 3" round though.
Logged
lloydsp
CNC Jedi
*****
Online Online

Posts: 3353



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2011, 01:56:51 am »

Bob, your score doesn't sound so shabby!  I was just very happy to finally find a saw I could both afford, and would cut an 8x8x25lb I-beam in about 20 minutes.

Johnson saws are good ones, too; especially the older ones.

Lloyd
Logged

Automation Machine Design, LLC.
--
"Doing the impossible in pyro automation every day."
Bob La Londe
CNC Jedi
*****
Online Online

Posts: 1364



View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2011, 02:12:46 am »

Is this one of those metal band saws with the saw assembley going up and down like a chop saw?  Some guys are making their own pneumatic cylinders to support those so they are never resting the full weight on the blade.  Not sure about all the particulars, but I imagein you could check around if you are interested. 
Logged

Getting started on CNC?  In or passing through my area?
If I have the time I'll be glad to show you a little in my shop. 

Some Stuff I Make with CamBam
http://www.YumaTackle.com
lloydsp
CNC Jedi
*****
Online Online

Posts: 3353



View Profile
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2011, 11:27:32 am »

Is this one of those metal band saws with the saw assembley going up and down like a chop saw?  Some guys are making their own pneumatic cylinders to support those so they are never resting the full weight on the blade.  Not sure about all the particulars, but I imagein you could check around if you are interested. 
----------

Bob, I've seen the counterbalancing done with pneumatics, but that's not usually the purpose of the hydraulics/pneumatics on the saws.

The actual weight on the blade is ordinarily controlled by a counter-balance spring, the force of which is user-adjustable with a handwheel or wrench.  The hydraulic/pneumatic cylinder (when present) is to control the rate at which the blade can fall. 

Say you're cutting an 8x8 I-beam, and it's lying so that you cut first through one flange, then the web, then the other flange.  If you apply enough force to the blade to cut properly through an 8" wide flange section, when it finally cuts through to the 3/8" wide web, the blade will hog into the narrow work much too aggressively.

Come the hydraulic rate cylinder... it won't allow the blade to fall any faster in the 3/8 section than whatever maximum rate you set via a bleeder control.

LLoyd
Logged

Automation Machine Design, LLC.
--
"Doing the impossible in pyro automation every day."
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines

Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS! Dilber MC Theme by HarzeM
Page created in 0.144 seconds with 17 queries.

Copyright © 2008 HexRay Ltd. | Sitemap